(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "X Collection 1912B"



X Collection 



INDEX 



Page:. 



^ss PQ^voi^ 'B/KiDee. 



Barcode Number 



LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 

iiim liiii Hill mil mil mil i iiii iiiii iiiii iiiii dii iiii 




029 767 371 3 
LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 



I 



INI Mil IIMI IIIII iiiii iiiii IIIII IIIII IIIII 




029 767 372 5 



LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 

■111; IIIII JiJlJ IIII mil IIIII IIIII mil mil iimi iiii iiii 




029 767 373 7 



LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 

Hi liiiiilii !l!j!""!"'*""'i**i 'I'liHi'diii'iNiiii 



Nillllll 11 nil II 

029 767 374 9 



LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 




029 767 375 



LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 

I iiSIII iilll I!!!! US'! 'J'" '"" "" ""' '"" "■" ""* "*' '■■' 



029 767 376 2 



Box Number 



^03 



I^O^f-A 



fo^3 






\1o/ 



10H 




Total of 
Volumes 



3 



Call Number 



25 



't 






TE-f( 



^ 






TFI- 
T^5. P3 









■■■% 






rNt:r 






//^-Cr. 



A-U 



l-^^ 



W '.'(' • V ■ 



X Collection 



INDEX 



Page:. 



a. 



Barcode Number 



LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 

iiKii mil Hill Mill mil mil iim iiiii iim iim iim im mi 




029 767 377 4 



LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 

■III lliii iiii'il i ill'" '"" '"" '"" '"" ' "" "<' iHi 




029 767 378 6 
LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 




029 767 379 8 



Box Number 






l?&/^ 



If 17 3 



Total of 
Volumes 



b 



\^Q. 



J\ 



Call Number 



TfS30- 









AXr. 






^-»S(^ 






Ky 



X-TG 1^0 

. 5^ 



® 3hr Clmn) ^^pids l^mild 

February 14, 1956 



ENGINEER IS 
A POET, TOO 

A Methodist Sunday School 
in Glandore, South Australia, 
revealed Monday that D. B. 
/ Steinman, New York bridge 

engineer and designer of the 
new Mackinac Bridge, is a 
mighty popular fellow there. 
Not for his bridges, how- 
ever. The church group said 
it has adopted a poem by 
Steinman, *Tartners," as a 
religious hymn. The popular 
tune is now known there as 
Hymn 261. 



Daily Tribune 



X-TG 140 



X 



c,.. 



i-h 



C\ 



CHEBOYGAN, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, JAN. 24, 1956 



Dr. Steinman 
Is Honored 
by France 

ST. IGNACE (UP)— Dr. Dav- 
id B. Steinman, designer and 
chief engineer of the Mackinac 
bridge, has been honored by 
France in recognition of his work 
in design and construction of 
long-span bridges. 

Steinman's office here said the 
two decorations conferred on him 
by France are the Cross of Com- 
mander of the Order of Merit and 
Education and the Cross of High 
Officer of the Order of Merit for 
Research and Invention. 

Steinman has received more 
than 50 international awards and 
honors from France, Belgium, 
England, Italy, India, Greece, 
Switzerland, Brazil, Mexico, Cu- 
ba and Panama. 



Scholarships 

AND 

FINANCIAL 



X.T'5 uo 

.3s 



:■ 



ASSISTANCE 



4. SPECIAL ENGINEERING SCHOLARSHIPS 

'' a. DAVID B. STEINMAN AWARDS. With an 
initial principal of $5,000, Dr. D. B. Stein- 
man, the world's foremost bridge designer, 
established this fund. Dr. Steinman sug- 
gested that the scholarship or awards (in 
the form of loans or grants) be given each 
year in the College of Engineering to stu- 
dents who need financial assistance to com- 
plete their engineering studies. The awards 
are made to deserving students upon recom- 
mendation of the faculty of the department 
involved and the Dean of the College of 
Engineering. Selection is based upon char- 
acter, scholarship, range of knowledge and 
interest, well-rounded performance, and 
leadership potentiality. These loans and 
grants range from $100 to $500. Where 
made as loans, the awards are non-interest 
bearing and voluntary debts of honor. The 
donor said, "I would certainly hope that 
any person who received an award would 
earnestly wish to repay it and thereby 
make it possible for future students to en- 
joy similar privileges." 



A Program Of Aid 

For Qualifying 

College Students 

1956-57 



OHIO NORTHERN 
UNIVERSITY 

ADA, OHIO 



• 




INGENIORiiK 



19561 



Ud g i V e t a f Da ns k In g en ierforening 
NR.15 • 24.APRIL1956 • 65.ARGANG 



X-TG 14 



• 



The Mackinac Bridge 

By D. B. Steinman, Consulting Engineer, New York 



624.21(73) 



Mr. D. B. Steinman er kendt verden over sum en af vor tids mest 
fremragende brobygningseksperter. Som projeklcrende ingenwr har han 
s&ledes forestdet beregningen og konsfruktionen af en long rxkke interes- 
sante og storsldede brobygningsarbejder. Efter den amerikanske »Wbo is 
What akal oi som eksempler her fremhceve folgende: Sgdamerikas storste 
heengebro ved Florianopolis i Brasilien, broen over Carquinez-strsedet i 
Calif ornien, som er den sterste Canlileverbro i U.S.A., broen over Grand 
Mere i stolen Quebec i Canada, St. Jobns-broen i Portland, Oregon, U. S. A., 
den beremte Sydney-havnebro i Australien, Koln-MOhlheim-broen over 
Rhinen, Ml. Hope-broen i R. J., U. S. A., Waldo Hancock-broen, den store 
Tir-borough bro, for ikke at glemme den store Henry Hudson-bro, begge 
i New York City, den sdkaldte ^Thousand Islands international Bridge* 
over St. Lawrence-floden og mange andre broer fordelt over alle 5 ver- 
densdele. 

Mr. D. B. Steinman er fedt 18S6 i New York, hvor han blev Bach, of Sc. 
I 1906. Han fortsatte sine studier ved Columbia University til 1909. I 1911 
bleu han Ph. D. og senere ogsd Sc. D. ved New York City Coll., ligesom 
han har modtaget seresdoktorgrader og andre eeresbevisninger fra en rsekke 
forskellige uniuersiteter og institutioner bdde i U.S.A. og andre lande. 

I drene 1910 — li var Mr. Steinman professor i civil engineering ved 
universitetet i Idaho. I 191i — 17 assieterede han som projekterende in- 
genier Gustav Lindenthal ved dennes konstruktion af »Hell Gatet-broen i 
New York. Fra 1917 — 20 var han igen professor, denne gang ved The City 
Coll. I New York. Siden 1920 har Mr. Steinman virket som projekterende 
ingenier i New York og har som sddan bl. a. medvirket oed ovenstdende 
arbejder, hvortil vi skal feje den nedenfor omtalte Mackinac-bro. 

Ligheden med vort eget problem, Store Bselt, er her umiskendelig, og 
ingen dansk laser vil kunne undgd at fele en vis misundelse ouerfor de 
handledygtige amerikanere, hvis land ger del muligt, som det her er sket, 
raskt og modigt at tage fat pd en sddan opgave og for et beleb af mindre 
end 100 mill, dollars at lese den bdde elegant og rigtigt pd nogle f& dr. 

Red. 



Introduction. 

The thought of connecting the 
two sections of the State of Michi- 
gan by a physical link across the 
Straits of Mackinac challenged the 
imagination of engineers and the 
public for the past three-quarters 
of a century. The difficulties, both 
physical and financial, appeared 
insurmountable. Various plans and 
designs were proposed from time 
to time during the past forty years. 
Some of the schemes would have 
been impossibly fantastic in cost, 
but the promoters did not know it. 
One official design for the proposed 
bridge would have collapsed before 
completion, but the officials did 
not know it. 

People (who were not engineers) 
said that the project was impos- 
sible; that the cost would be pro- 
hibitive; that it could not be finan- 
ced; that the bridge could be built; 
that the foundation problems could 
not be solved; that the wide glacial 
gorge under deep water in the 
middle of the Strait could not be 
spanned; that the bridge, if built, 
would not stand up; that it would 
be destroyed by the elements; that 



X-TS 14 

. Ss 



MACKINAC BRIDGE . . . ^'^i', 

■it 



(1) Designed for complete aerodynamic stability 

D. B. STEINMAN, M. ASCE, Contulling Engineer, New York, N. Y. 



(2) Located with first-order precision 

G. EDWIN PIDCOCK, M. ASCE, Directing Head, 6. Edwin Pidcock Co., Allentewn, Pa. 



(3) Foundations constructed at record speed 
by unusual methods 

R. M. BOYNTON, Asieclale Engineer, with 0. B. Sleinman, Consulting Engineer, New York, N. Y. 



X 

I 



^ 



(Reprinted from May 1956 issue of Civil Engineering, published and copyrighted by the American Society of Civil Engineers) 



THE AUSTRAIASIAN 

ENGINEER 



-4 



r^ 
G 






FEBRUARY 7, 1956 



X-TG 14 






ARCH BRIDGE 

The high road bears the speeding 
throngs; 

Few see the arching span below. 
But for those few the builder wrought 

A rainbow in the sunset glow. 



TOWARD THE DAWN 

Man dreams a high road toward the 

dawn. 

God give us strength to do our 

part — 

To build the bridge of human faith. 

The soaring span that lifts the 

heart. 
— By American Bridge Builder, 
Dr. D. B. Steinman. (Reprinted from 
"Columbia Alumni News. ") 



ANOTHER MEDAL FOR 
Dr. STEINMAN 

The Brazilian Government has con- 
ferred upon Dr. D. B. Steinman, in- 
ternationally eminent bridge engineer 
of New York City, the Marechal 
Caetano de Faria Medal in recognition 
of his professional achievements and, 
particularly, his notable engineering 
contribution to the Republic of Brazil. 
In ,1924-27, Dr. Steinman designed 
and built his world-famous Florianopo- 
lis Bridge over the waters of the 
Atlantic between the island city of 
Florianopolis and the mainland of 
Brazil. This bridge, of a new form 
invented and developed by Dr. 
Steinman, is still the largest bridge in 
South America and the longest eyebar 
suspension span in the world. 

The medal and diploma were official- 
ly presented to Dr. Steinman in a 
special ceremony and reception In his 
honour at the Brazilian Embassy in 
Washington, D.C. 



REPRINT FROM THE MARCH 1956 ISSUE OF 



X-TG 14 
.38 



\ 




The Official Pub/icafion of The Asseciared Genera/ Confractors of America, Inc. 




The tHackinac Sri4fe: ^.'nlZcl'^'iV.r'' 



By O. H. Millikan 

Engineer, The Prepakt Concrete Company 




w 



THE ASSOCIATED 6ENERAL CONTRACTORS OF AMERICA, INC. 
1227 Muniey Building, Wasiiingten 4, D. C. 



X-TG UO ? 



■'■r. 



Conquering the Impossible: 

THE MACKINAC BRIDGE 

hy 
Dr. David B. Steinman 



Reprinted from 

TECHNION YEAR BOOK 1956 

Published in the U. S. A. by the American Society for Technion ■ 
Israel Institute of Technology 



Contractors and 



Engineers 



X-TG 140 
.56 
MARCH 1956 



^ 

^ 
^ 



magazine of modern construction 



The bridge at Mackinac 

/n ihe land of fftawatAa, 

Where the white man gaged with 
awe 
At a paradise divided 

By the gtraiti of McLckinavi, — 

Through the depths of iey water, 
Battling tides around the eloole, 

Men are dredging, drilling, blotting. 
Driving caissons down to roei. 

Fleets of freighters bring their cargoes 
From the forges and the kUns; 

Stone and steel — ten thousand barge- 
loads — 
From the quarries, mines, and mills. 

Now the towers, mounting skyward, 
Beach the heights of airy space. 

Hear the rivet-hammers ringing. 

Joining steel in strength and grace. 

High above the swirling currents. 
Parabolic strands are strung; 

From the cables, packed with power, 
Wonder-spans of steel are hung. 

Generations dreamed the crossing; 

Doubters shook their heads in scorn. 
Brave men vowed that they would buHd 
it— 

From their faith a bridge was bom. 

There it spans the miles of water. 
Speeding millions on their way — 

Bridge of vision, hope, and courage, 
Portal to a brighter day. 

by Dr. David B. Steinman of Hew Tork 
City, N. ¥., designer and consultant 
of the Mackinac Bridge. 



X-TG 140 
.65 



/ ^ 



Beauty in Bridges 






by D. B. STEINMAN 



€ 






^oem« for |9our g^crapboofe 

In a Garden Long Ago 

By D. B. STEINMAN 

I remember summer roses in a garden long ago; 
You were with me, my beloved, in the golden moonlight 

glow. 
A nightingale was singing in the dreamy woodland 

grove 
And all the longing of my heart was in his song of love: 
You are sweet, sweet, sweet, my darling. 
Oh, my love, I love you so! 
The nightingale was singing in a garden long ago. 

I remember summer magic, all the sweetness in the air, 
The honeysuckles blending with the fragrance of your 

hair. 
The melody of moonlight and the starlight in your eyes 
Were mingled with the glory of the stars that filled the 

skies. 

You are sweet, sweet, sweet, my darling. 
Oh, my love, I love you so! 
All the stars were singing in a garden long ago. 



( Rcl>ri>ilt'd From The Poxlon J'nsI) 






y'Tei4o.^5^i6^ 



Poems for Your Scrapbook 

BEYOND THE STARS 

By D. B. Steimnan 

When man first flung a log astride a stream 
His urge to vanquish barriers sprang to birth; 
Strong strands of steel translate his lofty dream 
To link the farthest corners of the earth. 
He tames the sea and boldly dares to sail 
The very skies in globe-encirding llignt; 
His jets and rockets blaze a fiery trail 
And pierce the void with dazzling lanes of hght. 

Unsated still, though master now of space, 

Man's dauntless spirit strives to conquer time; 

Some inner flame impels his soul to trace 

Beyond the stars a destiny sublime. 

With light of faith to set his spirit free 
Man builds a bridge to span eternity. 



(RcpriiUcd from The Boston Post) 



I-JG 



140 

4m 



^oms for Pour ^craptioofe 

Christmas Magic 

By D. B. STEINMAN 

The star-shaped snowflakes softly fall 

To deck each bough with sparkling white 
With niagic wand the stars are hung 
1-ike jewels of celestial light 

The treetop holds, as crowning gem, 
The glowing Star of Bethlehem! • 

Once shepherds saw the wondrous Light- 

TV, f l,° ^"^ *^^y ^"«'* i" prayer. ' 
The humblest hearth now glows with Love 
Because His gift-a Child-is there! 
The angel voices sing again- 
Peace on Earth, Good Will to Men! 



(Reprinted Prom The Boston Post) 



TG 140" 
. S8 :^|1D 



'in '«-^TC«^■^li^T(S^T)■«^T/■«l-v»v.v»^./»•. ?•, J«^ >»\ f«^ 



^oemsi for |9our i^traptioofe 

What is Man, That Thou Art 
Mmdful of Him? 

Br D. B. STBNMAN 

In starry space the awestruck mind beholda 

Vast galaxies in ranks beyond surmise; 

Each spiral glow oi clustered light unfolds 

Ten billion stars ablaze in iar-oif skies. 

Of all this host some fate elected one 

To be the sun of life and light for man; 

Of all the globes that wheel around the sun 

God chose our humble planet for His plan. 

Beneath a rainbow flung across the earth 

The miracle of life began its climb, 

Until at last the human soul had birth 

With god-like flame transcending space and time. 

O, what is man, in all this boundless space. 
That Thou hast made his heart Thy dwelling place? 



(Reprinted from The Boston Pott) 



1.TG HO 

.Sa i/7/ 



^msmw^^F^^s^Mw^ipsifs^^'mm 




Scorns for |9our ^craptioofe 

The Star of Bethlehem 

By D. B. STEINMAN 

A million stars proclaimed Thy glory, 
With new-born light in one of them, 
The brightest in Thy diadem. 
To point the way to Bethlehem, 
When Love Divine was born. 

A million hearts enshrine Thy story; 
Aglow with love as carols ring. 
We hear the angel voices sing 
As once to shepherd and to king 
On that first Christmas morn. 



(ReprintrJ From The Boston Post) 



XrTG UO 



F fwwfwwwwt^M^wwMWH tagaem 



$oem£t for l^our ftcrapboob 

This Gladness I Hove Known 
Bt d. b. stbmman 

I have seen a bluebird on the wing, 
Above a field in gold ctnd scarlet hue; 

A spray of apple blossoms in the spring 
la dazzling light against a sky of blue. 

I have known the joy of golden days, 

A grassy bonk, a stream in jeweled glow; 

Then oak and maple leaves in autumn blaze, 
And pines in winter crowned with sunlit snow. 

God. I thank Thee for the gift of light 

And weep for those who dwell in endless night 




Reprinted from The Boston Post 



THE X-TG 140 



>: 



^e^^ 



PAGE 



With this edition of the Engineer, we conclude the second y«ar of 
our publication. Certainly I think I speak for both faculty and students 
in stating that this periodical has been a source of pride to all of us. It 
is therefore with a feeling of real pleasure that I congratulate the men 
who have been responsible for its success. 

As graduation approaches, I would like to say a few words to our 
graduates. Sonne of you heard the eminent engineer, Dr. David B. Stein- 
man ^ when he spoke at the University a few years ago. His recent 
remarks, when he received the Egleston Medal for Distinguished Engi- 
neering Achievement, seem particularly apropos to us at the University 
of Florida and therefore I am going to take the liberty to quote from 
his speech. 

"In order that Engineers may take their proper place as Leaders of 
their fellowmen, it is important that their educational preparation be 
broader than the strictly prescribed limits of technology. It must include 
a reasonable proportion of the social-humanistic studies, especially such 
cultural studies as history, sociology, literature, logic, art, writing, public 
speaking, psychology, and economics. 

"Finally, in a world of flux and confusion, when men are swayed 
by selfishness and fears, when the finer human instincts are derided 
and disparaged, and when we see all around us the decay of moral and 
ethical standards, there is a crying need for men of Ideals. 

"Engineering is inherently founded on certain Ideals — the Ideals 
of vision, character, honesty, and service to humanity. Engineers, by 
their education and their lifework, are naturally qualified to uphold 
and exemplify such ideals in their life, in their work, and in their 
relations with their fellowmen. 

"In conclusion, there is one thought that I want to leave with you. 
It is summarized in a single word — consecration. By that I mean all that 
goes into the feeling that our works live after us — that we are building 
not for ourselves but for posterity." 

As we close this scholastic year, may I too suggest that we make 
every effort to help build, for all the world, a better tomorrow. 





18 FLORIDA ENGINEER 



NEW YORK HERALD TRIBUNE 



X-TG 140 



Italy Plans 
New Links 
For Traffic 



By the Vnttei Prtu 

ROME, Aug. 37.— A bridge may 
link Sicily and the Italian main- 
land within ten yean. 

The project la In the serious plan- 
ning stage. 

Engineers also aim to drlvn a 
tunnel iinder Mont Blano, bringing 
I>aris up to 200 milea nearer north- 
em Italy by road. 

Yet another project is under vay 
to dig a sea outlet for Milan, a 
canal 47 miles long. 

These are three ot a host of mod- 
em engineering feats tiiat are ex- 
pected to change the face of an- 
eleat Italy within the next dftcadt: 

Wotld'i Longeet 

The bridge to Sicily would be the 
world's longest steel span. Designed 
by engineer David R Steinman, of 
New Vorlc City, It would cross the 
two-mile Straits of Messina. 

The tunnel under 16,780 -foot 
Mont Blanc would link Italy with 
France end Switzeriaitd and lessien 
dependence on the Alpine passes. 

The sea outlet for Milan, the 
Industrial capital of northern Italy, 
would consist of a 47-mlle canal 
Unking the city with the Po River | 
and thence the Adriatic Sea. 

Actual wcrk on the three projects 
Is expected to start in a matter of 
montha The tunnel and canal al- 
ready have been approved by the 
Italian govenuiMnt and Parliament 
A decision on the bridge is HQ)ected 
shortly. 

Of this stun, the Italian gorem- 
ment would have to pay only about 
$43,000,000, or slightly over one- 
fifth, with American and European 
private interests and the govern- 
ments of France and Switzerland 
coming up with the rest. 

Financing Plarned 

For the bridge, whose cost is mU- 
mated at $150,000,000. Italy would 
not have to pay a cent. Coostruc- 



tibn would be entirely financed by 
International banking Interests in 
the United States, and the loan 
and 6 or 6.5 per cent Interest moaH 
be redeemed in about SO yean 
through a moderate toll levied on 
v^ilcle* using the bridge. At the 
end of tlie 80-year period the bridge 
would become the property of the 
Italian government 

Under these conditions, there was 
Uttle doubt that Italy would gladly 
accept the deal. 

The bridge, whose construction 
would take seven or eight years, 
would crown a lifetime's work for 
68-yearK)ld Mr. Steinman, the build- 
er of more than 800 bridges in the 
Americas, Europe, Australia, China 
and Japan. 

It womd be by far the world's 
largest steel bridge, 10,826 feet long 
and about 91 feet iwide. Its cen- 
tral span, of exaatly 6,000 feet 
would by far exceed the 4,200-foot 
span of the Golden Gate Bridge 
at San Francisco. Two smaller side 
spans of 2,401 feet each and two 
anchors of 512 feet each would 
complete the structure. 

The bridge's lower level, 1B7 feet 
above the sea, would be reserved 
for train traffic. The "second floor," 
894 feet high, would comprise six 
ways for road traffic. Mr. Stein- 
man expects the bridge to handle 
600,000 railway cars with 4,000,000 
passengers, and more than 360,000 
vehicles a yeai-. The predicted vehi- 
cle traffic would be ten times the 
present average of 36,00d cars and 
trucks yearly: 

Would Rednce Cost 

The main reason for the expected 
increase in vehicle traffic was the 
reduced cost, Mr. Steinman said at 
a recent press conference in Rome. 
A truck and trailer, which now pays 
24,000 to 30,000 lire ($38.40 to $48) 
iOr transport across the straits on 
a state-owned ferry, would haive to 
pay a bridge toll of only 8,000 or 
9,000 lire ($12.80 to $1*40) . 

The bridge would break Sicily's 
age-old isolation at a time when 
prospects for an oil boom are rais- 
ing high hopes in the poverty- 
stricken island. Recent borings by 
the Anglo-Iranian and Gulf Oil 
Companies showed high-grade oil 
layers of still undisclosed size at 
a depth of 10,000 feet In southern 
Sicily. 



X-TG 140 H 



Where Southern Skies beguile 

By D. B. Steinman 

O come with me where palm trees grow 

Against a sapphire sky, 
A garden spot where soft winds blow 

And sunht clouds drift by. 

The lithe trunks flex hke supple wands 

As perfumed breezes play; 
Like lifted arms the curving fronds 

Combine in graceful sway. 

Like brown-skinned maidens in their dance 

On some exotic isle. 
The swaying palm trees waft romance 

Where southern skies beguile. 



Kcpftnwd troni 
Boston Post 



JCamot Write A Pom. "Dear j 

By D. B. Steinman 



I cannot write a poem, dear. 

But since it is your sweet commana 
That I must rhyme to bring you cheer, 

I let my heart-beats guide my hand. 

An earth-born clod, I often nod 
When I essay a verse or tw^o. 

The only perfect poet is God: 
He wrought his poetry in you. 



Reprinted from 
The Boston Post 



Mck Mdge 

By D. B. Steinman 

The high road bears the speeding throngs; 

Few see the arching span below. 
But for those few the builder wrought 

A rainbow in the sunset glow. 



Zoward Zke Dawn 

Man dreams a high road toward the dawn. 

God give us strength to do our part — 
To build the bridge of human faith, 

The soaring span that lifts the heart. 



X-TG UO A 

3 



Reprinted from 
Columbia Alumni News 



X-TG 140 ' 

?! 



Out Of Zhe 700 ^ 

By D. B. Steinman 



The foghorn blasts the night in mournful tone 
And passing ships sound horns in hoarse reply, 
Each veiled in blinding mist, bereft, alone. 

Impenetrable fog enshrouds the sky 

And cloaks the sea with chilling clouds of doom, 

A world in shrouds as though about to die. 

Beyond the rocks the ghost-ships dimly loom. 
Each blinded bark in moaning call, forlorn. 
With black-veiled waters waiting to entomb. 

Across the dark the wailing sounds are borne; 
The stars are dead, the earth remains to mourn. 

Into the rolling fog the seamen stare 
For lights afar that blur and fade away. 
Leaving the ships to grope in grim despair. 

The brave of heart can only hope and pray 
For end of night and perils that surround. 
At last a rose-hued dawn unveils the day. 

And then the sun breaks through. In glad rebound 
Beneath blue skies, all hearts rejoice to see 
Gods world so beautiful, with sunlight crowned. 

Out of the fog of night, from darkness free. 
With hope reborn, all men give thanks to Thee. 



Reprinted from 
The Boston Post 



\ 



Saster Jn My Qatden 

By D. B. Steinman 

On Easter mom, with reverent hush. 

My garden greets the dawn's first ray; 

Then, high aloft, a lilting thrush 

Acclaims with joy the new-horn day. 

The leaves and blossoms, dewy bright. 
Are framed against the dome of blue. 

Like stained-glass windows, tinting light 
In slanting rays of jeweled hue. 

The benediction streaming down 

Now gilds the trembling leaves with fire. 
While birds in vestments, red and brown 

Alight on boughs to form a choir. 

They sing the joy of all the earth 

On spring's return to field and grove; 

They sing the hymn of life's rebirth: 

God lives to fill the world with love. 



X.TG UO ^ 



S8 



e 



Jl 



Reprinted from 
Partners 



As A Starless Sky 

By D. B. Steinman 



As a starless sky 

Reveals no gleam, 
So life is dismal — 

Without a dream. 

In drought and dust 
A road is long; 

So hfe is dreary — 

Without a song. 

As an arid plain 

Is waste and bare. 
So life is drab — 

Without a prayer. 



X-TG UO 
S8 



Reprinted (roni 
N. Y. Daily Mirkor 



• 



X-TG U(J ^ 

c 

Melp Mc. Cord. Zo Mid My Span 

By D. B. Steinman 



AncKored firm in solid rock, 

On Thy foundation let me build — 
Strong to bear each strain and shock. 

An arch of dreams and faith fulfilled. 

Help me, Lord, to build my span 

In strength and grace across the years: 

Firm in purpose, true in plan. 

Above the tides of doubt and fears. 

Help me build on Thy high road 

A bridge to serve the common good; 

To smooth the way and lift the load, 
A link of human brotherhood. 

Help me make my work a shrine. 

With glimpses of eternity; 
A humble prayer in every line, 

A bridge from human heart to Thee. 



ReprinteJ from 
New York Daily Mirrob 



X-TG UO H 

C 



Zhe mdges OfD. n. S. 



D reams he had dreamt, while still a fretful youth 

A nd castles built, in the Spain of each man's heart, 

V ihrant and shimmering with beauty's truth, 

I rradiant with the Creator's art. 

D reams they are no longer; there they stand, 

B eauty and Truth and Spirit, hand-in-hand. 

S ee them as they balance over streams, 

T heir turrets probing steel into the skies, 

E ach an embodiment of early dreams, 

I nvestitures of youth's poetic sighs. 

N arrows and gorges crossed, with many a span, 

M ore gossamer than silk; all things of joy 

A re these that bridge the distances of man: 

N ascent, at first, as visions of a boy. 



— Sidney Wallach 



X-TG UO 



MICfflGAN TECH HOLDS 
66th COMMENCEMENT 

A colorful academic procession ush- 
ered in the 66th Commencement of 
the Michigan College of Mining and 
Technology, held at Dee Stadium 
on May 23. A total of 216 Bachelor 
of Science degrees and seventeen 
Master's degrees were conferred. 

Sharing in the honors with the 
graduating students were Dr. David 
B. Steinman, noted bridge designer, 
Morris F. LaCroix, president of the 
Copper Range Company, and Clar- 
ence H. Hitchcock '06, president of 
Smith & Traverse Company, Ltd., 
upon whom were conferred honorary 
Doctor of Engineering degrees. 

Dr. David B. Steinman gave the 
Commencement address which is 
quoted elsewhere in this issue. 



sense of artistic form. He has de- 
signed and will direct the construc- 
tion of the Mackinac Straits Bridge. 
Ke is designing and will direct con- 
struction of the great Straits of Mes- 
sina Bridge in Italy. 

More than a distinguished engineer, 
Dr. Steinman has won recognition 
as a scientist, mathematician, artist, 
inventor, educator, author, poet, and 
humanitarian. In the words of 
Joseph M. Donnelly, who presented 
Dr. Steinman for his degree, "Here, 
then, is one of the truly outstanding 
men of science of our times." 

In conferring the Doctor of Engi- 
neering degree on Dr. Steinman, Dr. 
Dillman said in part, "Your attain- 
ments have been marked by a rare 
mental flexability and breadth of 
interest. Your genius has created 

from stone and steel monuments of 




David B. Strinman 



Dr. Steinman is known throughout 
the world as a designer of great 
bridges, and over 300 bridges stand 
as lasting memorials to his suf)crb 
skill as an engineer and to his keen 



inspiring beauty and lasting utility. 
And above all else you have devoted 
your energies toward a humanitarian 
idea of service to your fellowmen." 



I u 



i^a 




■4 



7^ 



Dr. D. B. Steinman Awarded High Greek Honor 

At special ceremonies in the Greek Orthodox Church of Saint George in New York City on October 17, 1954, the 
Grand Cross, Cordon and Diploma of the Order of Saint Dennis of Zante was conferred upon Dr. D. B. Steinman, in- 
ternationally eminent bridge engineer. The presentation was made on behalf of His Eminence the Most Reverend 
Metropolitan Chrysostomos, Titular Archbishop of the Island of Zante, Greece, by Dr. P. Voultsos. The citation 
recorded Dr. Steinman's professional achievements, his contributions toward strengthening international relations, and 
his many humanitarian and philanthropic activities. 

Participating in the award ceremonies were the Senior and Junior Priests of the Greek Orthodox Church, the Very 
Reverend Archimandrite Nikandros Eoannou; Reverend Soterios Mitrakos; Dr. Hamilton Cameron, the Grand Marshall 
of the Order of Saint Dennis of Zante; Dr. D. K. Zongos, the Grand Chancellor of the Order; the Greek American War 
Veterans; the General Staff of the Greek Legion;. the Pan-Zakynthian Society, and the Governing Board of the Greek 
Community of St. George. The church choir chanted the traditional hymn to Saint Dennis during the processional. 

In acknowledging the honor. Dr. Steinman expressed his wish for the betterment of international relations, for 
the promotion of Greek culture, and for charity, peace and good will in all mankind. 



iCopy 1%6 



THE FAITH OF A BRIDGEBDILDER 

by 
D. B. Steinman, Consulting Engineer 



One of a series of radio talks on "Religion in Everyday Life." 
under the auspices of the 

Laymen's National Committee, Inc. 
new york, n. y. 



/t ^d^M'*** 



that will last forever 




WUat iU neadefU i^ — 



"Poems that brid.^e man's yearnings to the 
eternal." 

"These poems have a warmth arid a human- 
ness." 

"Both spiritual vision and artistry of expres- 
sion." 

"The poems are beautiful. Their deep and 
abiding messages are nothing short of inspi- 
rational." 

"Poetry to Steinman is what the violin was to 
Einstein, a reminder of the dreams, ideals 
and visions of man." 



Mail this coupon for culogrophod copiot 



D. B. STEINMAN 

117 Liberty St., N. Y. 6, N. Y 

Please send copy(s) of the new book, 

"I Boilf a Bridge" Price: $2.00 each. Inscribe »o: 



Nc 



Addr 



X-TG 140 



As advertised in Janu-ary issue of the American Enginf.kr 



iG 140 
,S6 



As Zhrough A Misted Qlass 

By D. B. Steinman 

As through a misted glass we faintly glimpse 
A shimmering vision of the spirit realm — 
The veil that mortal eye may never rend. 
We gaze with yearning toward that fair mirage, 
Striving to hold it as it fades from view. 
Then we awake, hut never can we know 
Which state is dream, and which reality. 



'A 



i 

i 



Reprinted from 
The Christian Century 



X 
• S 8 r 



THE FAITH OF A BRIDGEBDILDER 

by 
D. B. Steinman, Consulting Engineer 



One of a series of radio talks on "Religion in Everyday Life." 

under the auspices of the 

Laymen's National Committee, Inc. 

new york, n. y. 



X-TG 140 
.58 



Foi Your Christmas Giving! 



Just Published . . . 
this braud new book ivill make an attrac- 
tive (^ift for the youngsters on your list. 



The book is a juvenile, written 
especially for the ages nine to four- 
teen but many others will find it 
of interest. 



THE author traces 
the (levckipiuent of 
the liridge from its he- 
,i;iiiniiio; in prehistoric 
times down tfi the <(reat 
steel spans of today, 
from a j^reat knowl- 
edge of his profession. 
Dr. Steinman gives us 
vivid tales of the men 
who advanced the sci- 
ence of bridge c< instruc- 
tion. 



.\Iong with these stories 
<if great men and their 
deeds, Dr. Steinman 
tells some of the secrets 
of his craft. In interest- 
ing and easily under- 
stood detail, he recounts 
the history and develoii- 
ntent of the suspension 
bridge, the arch bridge, 
the truss bridge and the 
cantilever bridge. 



DR. DAVID B. STEINMAN 

is an inieniatioiKillv cniineiu bridge engineer, wh().>;e life 
,in(i wurk have heen an inspiration to thousands of yonn;; 
engineers and engineering students not only in the United 
States but throughout the world. Si.\ of liis bridges have 
been honored in the annual awards lor the luost beautiful 
bridge? in America. 

In .iddition to having had many honors bestowed uinm 
hnn by this and foreign countries. Dr. Steinman received 
a civic award for his work on the reconstruction of the 
I'.rooklvn Bridge. He has recentlv been engaged for the 
v\c.rld's' largest bridge project, the .<y(),(KHM>00 Strait- 
of Mackinac I'ridge in Michigan. 




Si. 75 per copy 



Published hy Random House 

• Richly illustrated with 2-color drawings and beau- 
tiful photographs. 

• Answers the questions of "How?" and 
"Why.'" 

• Dramatic stories of bridge building. 



Give This Book — Each Copy Personally Inscrihed by the Author 



DR. D. B. STEINMAN 

117 LIBERTY ST.. NEW YORK 6, N. Y. 


P/eose inscribe a copy fo each 
o/ fhe following: 




Please inscribe as shown and send me copies 
of your new book "FAMOUS BRIDGES OF THE 


NAME 




WORLD" at $1.75 per copy. Enclosed is check [2. 
money order [j, for $ 

NAME 


NAME 




ADDRESS 


NAME 




CITV ZONE STATE 





FILL 
IN 

AND 

MAIL 

THIS 

COUPON 

ORDER 
NOW 



Only Zfty Spark 

r3y D. B. Steinman 



X-- 



i>3 :^ 






C 






We are but human, earthy, frail. 

Only Thy spark can animate 
And give us strength for life s travail. 

With joy to dream, aspire, create. 

We need Thy glow to learn the way 

To hft men s hearts, to sing Thy song. 

Transmute with fire this earth-born clay. 
To make hfe beautiful and strong. 



Rrprinlrd froiH 
1 Ht Boston Post 



X-TG UO 



€ 



fj*-^ 



"■5 




/ 



SM88SH &Sgmiii^^ 





Mackinac Straits Bridge, Michigan 



Prentiss M. Brown, Chairman, Mackinac Bridge Authority 
D. B. Steinman, Designing and Consulting Engineer 
Glenn B. Woodruff, Associate Consultant 



X-TG Ihd. 

c 






LIST OF PUBLICATIONS 
of 

D. B. STEINMAN 

Consulting Engineer 

New York 



x-,G ua *-ls 140 



PROFESSIONAL RECORD 
of 

D. B. STEINMAN 

Consulting Engineer 

New York 



\ 



'SS" \ 



^\-